iOS Printing Made Easy – Print Directly from Your iPad’s Print Menu

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]iOS Printing Made Easy – Print Directly from Your iPad’s Print Menu – Lantronix

xPrintServer
(iPad not included.)

Designed to help business and consumer users of Apple iOS products print directly from their device to a networked printer, xPrintServer closes the loop on what’s missing for iPad and iPhone users in office settings.

xPrintServer provides wireless printing capabilities for iOS devices such as the iPads and iPhones using their native print menus. It eliminates the need to print through apps, install software, or email yourself documents for printing.

Complete xPrintServer Supported Printer List

Now that’s the missing link for those of us who don’t wish to have to buy a new printer just to print from our iDevices (iPad (iPad/iPad 2*), iPhone (3GS or later), and iPod Touch (3rd Gen or later).
*Since they kept the iPad name for iPad 3rd Generation, I would hope they didn’t have to specify iPad 3rd Generation?
Much more info available on the website.

Thanks to Michael Lasky, Best Hardware section of this week’s WindowsSecrets.com Newsletter for the heads up on this one!

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Chrome trumps IE as world’s top browser

Chrome trumps IE as world’s top browser – Computerworld

StatCounter says Google’s browser edged Microsoft’s for the week’s No. 1 spot; Chrome on pace to take May, too

Google Chrome eclipsed Microsoft's Internet Explorer for the first time last week, according to an Irish metrics company. (Data: StatCounter.)

Google Chrome eclipsed Microsoft’s Internet Explorer for the first time last week, according to an Irish metrics company. (Data: StatCounter.)

This is quite understandable since Google Chrome has most of the same great extensions as Mozilla Firefox, as well as tab separation/sandboxing, active updating happens behind the scenes, and it has built-in Flash plugin so users don’t have to worry about keeping Flash updated separately since Google Chrome takes care of that.

And for those who use more than one OS, it is also cross platform.

I use Google Chrome in Linux, and as a alternative browser in both Mac and Windows, although my main browser in Mac and Linux is still Firefox for the most part.

Still, I am impressed by the money being paid out for Bounties for vulnerabilities in the Google Chrome browser. I really like that they are so pro-active about getting vulnerabilities corrected.

Google Chrome certainly makes life easier!

Adobe Flash Zero Day Bug Emergency Patch

Adobe patches new Flash zero-day bug with emergency update – Computerworld

Adobe today warned that hackers are exploiting a critical vulnerability in its popular Flash Player program, and issued an emergency update to patch the bug.

“There are reports that the vulnerability is being exploited in the wild in active targeted attacks designed to trick the user into clicking on a malicious file delivered in an email message,” the Friday advisory said.

All editions of the Flash player are affected, but those abusing this vulnerability are targeting Internet Explorer with this current exploit and Adobe is giving it their Priority 1 status:

The update was pegged with Adobe’s priority rating of “1,” used to label patches for actively-exploited vulnerabilities or bugs that will likely be exploited. For such updates, Adobe recommends that customers install the new version within 72 hours.

In this case of course it’s already actively being exploited. So don’t wait! Don’t be a target, get your Adobe Flash Player update today!

Mac Malware Targeting Unpatched Office Running on OS X – Not the same as before

Mac Malware Targeting Unpatched Office Running on OS X – eWeek

This is a different issue than reported earlier on this blog here on April 16th.

Microsoft is reporting that malware is exploiting unpatched versions of its Microsoft Office Word 2000 suite to compromise Apple Macintoshes running Snow Leopard or earlier versions of Mac OS X.

Microsoft has discovered malware that’s preying on Apple computers running unpatched versions of its Office application suite.

The two vulnerabilities in question were patched in the Microsoft Office Word 2000 suite in June 2009, almost three years ago.

At that time, Microsoft put out a critical security bulletin—MS09-027—to close the holes, which can allow an attacker to get control of a system if a user opens a maliciously crafted Word file.

Much more in the article.

These Office Word 2000 installs on Mac OS X should have been patched by users for 3 years now.

Another troubling situation is that the malware seems to be targeting Snow Leopard and earlier versions of Mac OS X; not Lion.

With Lion the particular memory address being abused to run shellcode isn’t vulnerable like in earlier versions of Mac OS X.

So, if you have ANY version of Microsoft Office software running on your Mac, make sure it is up to date.

Better yet, if you have any software running on your Mac make sure it is updated including MS Office, Java, and other Internet facing programs, as well as Mac OS X itself. This should be obvious to must Mac users by now, but certainly bears repeating.

This is not just a Mac problem, but it has been exacerbated on Macs because getting MS updates for MS Office on the Mac apparently hasn’t been done as religiously as it often is on MS Windows systems, which are also vulnerable by the way.

Microsoft Security Bulletin MS09-027 – Critical
Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office Word Could Allow Remote Code Execution (969514).

For Mac OS X, MS Office 2011/Office 14, Microsoft has a page showing how to check for software updates automatically.

Microsoft has a page to download MS Office Updates (at least back to Office 2004)

Religious websites riskier than porn for online viruses: study

Religious websites riskier than porn for online viruses: study – Raw Story

Web wanderers are more likely to get a computer virus by visiting a religious website than by peering at porn, according to a study released on Tuesday.

“Drive-by attacks” in which hackers booby-trap legitimate websites with malicious code continue to be a bane, the US-based anti-virus vendor Symantec said in its Internet Security Threat Report.

The same article, or variations on the theme have been have been run by many news/technology venues such as InformationWeek, NYDailyNews, WallStreetJournal Blogs, CSO Online, PCWorld, etc. Many created their own stories from the report, so well worth a read.

Where did all this information come from:
Symantec Internet Security Threat Report – 2011
Symantec Logo - Confidence in a Connected World - Click to view Malicious Code Threat Report 2011

Malware in 2011
By analyzing malicious code we can determine which threats types and attack vectors are being employed. The endpoint is often the last line of defense, but it can often be the first-line of defense against attacks that spread using USB storage devices, insecure network connections and compromised, infected websites. Symantec’s cloud-based technology and reputation systems can also help to identify and block new and emerging attacks that haven’t been seen before, such as new targeted attacks employing previously unknown zero-day exploits. Analysis of malware activity trends both in the cloud and at the endpoint can help to shed light on the wider nature of threats confronting businesses, especially from blended attacks and threats facing mobile workers.

Corresponding to their large internet populations, the United States, China and India remained the top sources for overall malicious activity. …

The reference about religious sites?

Moreover, religious and ideological sites were found to have triple the average number of threats per infected site than adult/pornographic sites. We hypothesize that this is because pornographic website owners already make money from the internet and, as a result, have a vested interest in keeping their sites malware-free – it’s not good for repeat business.

And here’s just one more small area of the report:

Exploiting the Web: Attack toolkits, rootkits and social networking threats

Attack toolkits, which allow criminals to create new malware and assemble an entire attack without having to write the software from scratch, account for nearly two-thirds (61%) of all threat activity on malicious websites. As these kits become more widespread, robust and easier to use, this number is expected to climb. New exploits are quickly incorporated into attack kits. Each new toolkit version released during the year is accompanied with increased malicious Web attack activity. As a new version emerges that incorporates new exploit functionality, we see an increased use of it in the wild, making as much use of the new exploits until potential victims have patched their systems. For example, the number of attacks using the Blackhole toolkit, which was very active in 2010, dropped to a few hundred attacks per day in the middle of 2011, but re-emerged with newer versions generating hundreds of thousands of infection attempts per day towards the end of the year.
On average, attack toolkits contain around 10 different exploits, mostly focusing on browser independent plug-in vulnerabilities like Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Reader and Java. Popular kits can be updated every few days and each update may trigger a wave of new attacks.
They are relatively easy to find and sold on the underground black market and web forums. Prices range from $40 to $4,000. …

The whole report is well worth a read! There is only so much you can put into an article.

Much more in the report!

Oracle Java SE Update – Critical Update

Oracle Java SE Update – Security Garden

Oracle Java released an update to Java SE 6 and Java SE 7.

Edited to clarify:  Included in the Oracle updates are eighty-eight (88) new critical security fixes across numerous Oracle products, listed in the Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory.  It is strongly advised that the update be installed for those products as soon as possible due to the thread posed by a successful attack.

More in the article.

Time to start checking Java.com for updates from Oracle that fix the latest Bugfixes for Java for your Windows, Solaris, and Linux operating systems. Linux users can also check their distros for these updates, and Mac users should start checking rigorously for updates to Java SE 6 from Apple.

NOTE: As of 10:37 AM EDT today, April 28, 2012, the Java website still shows Java SE 6, Update 31.

You will want to check the download links on Security Garden’s posting for the most recent updates. Or here on Oracle’s download page for Java SE Runtime Environment 6 Update 32 for Linux, Solaris, Windows (mainstream version that works with most applications). Mac OS X users still need to get their Java SE 6, Update 32 from Apple, so please keep checking!

Thanks for keeping us updated on Oracle’s Java status, Security Garden!

New, sneakier Flashback malware infects Macs

New, sneakier Flashback malware infects Macs – Computerworld

A new, sneakier variant of the Flashback malware was uncovered yesterday by the French security firm Intego.

Flashback.S, which Intego described Monday, uses the same Java vulnerability as an earlier version that has infected an estimated 820,000 Macs since its appearance and still plagues over 600,000 machines.

But unlike Flashback.K, the variant that first surfaced last month and has caused consternation among Mac users, Flashback.S never asks the victim to enter an administrative password for installation, but instead relies only on the silent exploit of the Java bug to sneak onto the system.

“The differences are very subtle,” Peter James, a spokesman for Intego, said in an interview Tuesday. “There’s no password request [by Flashback.S].”

Much more in the two page article.

Apple will likely need to update their seek and destroy tool very quickly to help users stay free of this new variant.

If you think you are beginning to need an antivirus/antimalware solution, there are quite a few out there. Below are just a few:


Sophos Anti-Virus for Mac Home Edition
– Sophos has a worthy product out there and it is nice that they make their money on corporate/business computers and offer the home version for free.

ClamXav The Free Anti-Virus Solution for Mac OS X It uses the popular open source ClamAV engine as it’s back end and has the ability to detect both Windows and Mac threats.

There are other options as well for the Pay to Play crowd.

ESET Cybersecurity for Mac

And others from Intego Virus Barrier for Mac free and Pro versions available in the Mac App Store. Intego as noted above found this newest FlashBack in the wild). Other Mac antivirus firms Symantec/Norton, and many more.

Many of these come with a heavy CPU usage hit that is very annoying considering the small number of actual threats out there for the Mac. Of course some users may feel that the ones that provide real time protection are the way to go, some may feel it is worth it if their Macs are speedy enough and they have enough RAM.

For those who don’t think they need a Mac antivirus just yet, if you don’t use Java or none of your programs use Java, you could go to the ~/Applications/Utilities/Java Preferences.app and disable Java until you actually need it and then re-enable it as needed. It’s a very easy thing to do really.

Or you could set up AppleScript to monitor areas where malware might inject itself so it will alert you.

Monitor OS X LaunchAgents folders to help prevent malware attacks – CNET

Some additional locations to add can be found at MrAnderson.info here.

Also installing Piriform CCleaner for Mac is a great idea and can be run as needed very quickly every day even.

Certainly less of a system resource hit and one could still have a non-resident antivirus and scan at your convenience and respond if the Applescript tells you something is going on that you didn’t instigate by installing a program, etc.

The Applescript monitoring locations that you can set up is built with Mac OS X which is light on resources and free. The Applescript monitoring does a similar thing as WinPatrol does in Windows – but of course in a very small area comparatively. WinPatrol does so much more but the key similarity is the monitoring for changes to areas that malware can hit a Windows PC.

What we need for people who are not very savvy about these things is a MacPatrol app like WinPatrol.

Call Starkist