Emails with Malware URLs

It is amazing to me how many malicious emails one can get!

Just today, I got one that purported to be from CNBC, however, the link was not any of the CNBC franchise websites. So I thought, well, maybe I missed one?

I searched Google for the root domain name in email link and it tried to give me real life news channel results which were of course all legitimate websites, not the dangerous one that was in the email.

However, it did give the ability to search on the exact domain again if I really meant it, which of course I did. The only links available — which I was very happy to see — for that domain name were several links to malwareURL.com – (The MalwareURL Team is a group of Internet security experts dedicated to fighting malware, Trojans and a multitude of other web-related threats) that exposed the website in the email as a malware site for a work at home scam:

This web site is a known security risk – Detailed web site security report

Security Category: Work-At-Home scam

The results on the link above about the website stated the following:

Domain matching reallivenewschannel.com were found in our database.

1348 other active domains were found on 707 IP(s) for AS30058 (FDCSERVERS)

Show the report for AS30058 (FDCSERVERS)

Malicious URLs on reallivenewschannel.com
/weeknews/lastnews.php
/weeknews/go.php

Blacklist
Google
Google Diagnostic Page

My WOT
WOT Score Card

hpHosts
hpHosts listing

MalwareDomainList
MDL listing

After the above information, there was information specific to the domain.

Interestingly, the domain appears to be registered in NY, USA.

The name servers are in .RU/Ukranian domain origins.

In addition, this malware link in the email had a prefix that looked like the following, except I changed the numbers in the link:

cf533cb444.reallivenewschannel.com

NOTE: Notice the above is not a live link as we don’t want to visit under any circumstances, unless you are a security researcher preferably using a throwaway Virtual Machine or live CD.

If I had looked at this email in full HTML as it was intended by the malware purveyors, it would have looked somewhat like the following in simple HTML except it would likely have had the look of a CNBC website rather than just the text as it does in simple HTML:

A CNBC Event – Work At Home Mom Makes Almost $10,000/Month, Part-Time

Patricia Feeney of , never thought she’d have a job working at home until she filled out a simple form online, one afternoon. Before she knew it, she had discovered her secret to beating the recession and no longer had worries about being able to provide for her family – and she did all of this by working from home. » Continue reading

CNBC
To unsubscribe to this email click here. If this e-mail was forwarded to you and you’d like to sign up for additional alerts from CNBC click here.

© 2012 CNBC, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 900 Sylvan Avenue, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632

See where the Continue reading is? That was the link, totally obfuscated from view to trick users into thinking it was a CNBC link when actually it was linked to the full malware URL I have been discussing in this posting.

Pretty convincing isn’t it? Looks like a legitimate email from CNBC.

If you looked at the email source, you would also have seen that the real Return path is not CNBC, but a user from a .pl domain.

Thankfully, SpamAssassin did give it a 6.5 Spam Status level (required was 5 so it was 1.5 beyond the level required to be considered Spam. X-Spam-Report says the following:

X-Spam-Report: 
*  2.3 FROM_STARTS_WITH_NUMS From: starts with many numbers
*  1.8 URI_HEX URI: URI hostname has long hexadecimal sequence
*  0.0 HTML_MESSAGE BODY: HTML included in message
*  2.3 MIME_HTML_ONLY BODY: Message only has text/html MIME parts
*  0.1 RDNS_NONE Delivered to trusted network by a host with no      rDNS

Sadly, many emails that look like they originate from legitimate sites come in every day and people are often fooled by them. Many times just because they look at emails in HTML.

These types of things would fall by the wayside if everyone was more wary and understood that when they send out millions of emails like this likely every day or every week, it only takes 1.5% of the people to respond to make it well worth while to the spam, malware, phishingspear phishing, or scam (or any combination together) purveyors.

Also check out the Anti-Phishing Workgroup website for more information.

There are many of us who have been using email clients that allow you to view emails as Plain Text such as; Thunderbird (opensource – free – accepts donations), Postbox ($9.95 – based on Thunderbird and by original Thunderbird developers), Pegasus (free but proprietary – accepts donations), and there are many others that allow plain text. Most Linux based email clients give this ability as well.

Oddly, however, although Apple Mail granularly allows you to choose (after already choosing the email message) to read in plain text on an email by email basis — Apple Mail DOES NOT have an option in Preferences that allows you to choose to view emails as Plain Text by default which would prevent many problems with these dangerous types of emails. This is very sad news for Apple users. Microsoft Outlook DOES NOT give users the ability to view emails in Plain Text either (on an email by email or by option in preferences). I would very much like to know why Microsoft and Apple do not give that option to people. These are the two most ubiquitous email clients used in OS X and Windows.

I have read emails in plain text from the very beginning. Intentionally. Simply because I don’t want to be accidentally fooled by this type of  spammalwarephishingspear phishing, or scam.

Email clients like Thunderbird (opensource – free – accepts donations), Postbox ($9.95 based on Thunderbird and by original Thunderbird developers), Pegasus (free but proprietary – accepts donations) give the ability to view in original HTML, simple (non-executable) HTML or Plain text. They also give you the ability to allow or disallow images inline! Very important if you wish not to be tracked by email senders with beacon ads, web beacons, web bugs. These email clients also give an easy way to view the source of an email so you can do your own investigation of information in the headers or body of the email, and to facilitate sending comprehensive email information about spammers, etc. to sites like PayPal, Google, eBay, your bank, etc.

Sadly even many website based email clients, like GMail, Yahoo Mail, Outlook.com, Hotmail, MSN Email, etc, go only half way in regard to these very necessary capabilities … if that.


		
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Mac Malware Targeting Unpatched Office Running on OS X – Not the same as before

Mac Malware Targeting Unpatched Office Running on OS X – eWeek

This is a different issue than reported earlier on this blog here on April 16th.

Microsoft is reporting that malware is exploiting unpatched versions of its Microsoft Office Word 2000 suite to compromise Apple Macintoshes running Snow Leopard or earlier versions of Mac OS X.

Microsoft has discovered malware that’s preying on Apple computers running unpatched versions of its Office application suite.

The two vulnerabilities in question were patched in the Microsoft Office Word 2000 suite in June 2009, almost three years ago.

At that time, Microsoft put out a critical security bulletin—MS09-027—to close the holes, which can allow an attacker to get control of a system if a user opens a maliciously crafted Word file.

Much more in the article.

These Office Word 2000 installs on Mac OS X should have been patched by users for 3 years now.

Another troubling situation is that the malware seems to be targeting Snow Leopard and earlier versions of Mac OS X; not Lion.

With Lion the particular memory address being abused to run shellcode isn’t vulnerable like in earlier versions of Mac OS X.

So, if you have ANY version of Microsoft Office software running on your Mac, make sure it is up to date.

Better yet, if you have any software running on your Mac make sure it is updated including MS Office, Java, and other Internet facing programs, as well as Mac OS X itself. This should be obvious to must Mac users by now, but certainly bears repeating.

This is not just a Mac problem, but it has been exacerbated on Macs because getting MS updates for MS Office on the Mac apparently hasn’t been done as religiously as it often is on MS Windows systems, which are also vulnerable by the way.

Microsoft Security Bulletin MS09-027 – Critical
Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office Word Could Allow Remote Code Execution (969514).

For Mac OS X, MS Office 2011/Office 14, Microsoft has a page showing how to check for software updates automatically.

Microsoft has a page to download MS Office Updates (at least back to Office 2004)

New, sneakier Flashback malware infects Macs

New, sneakier Flashback malware infects Macs – Computerworld

A new, sneakier variant of the Flashback malware was uncovered yesterday by the French security firm Intego.

Flashback.S, which Intego described Monday, uses the same Java vulnerability as an earlier version that has infected an estimated 820,000 Macs since its appearance and still plagues over 600,000 machines.

But unlike Flashback.K, the variant that first surfaced last month and has caused consternation among Mac users, Flashback.S never asks the victim to enter an administrative password for installation, but instead relies only on the silent exploit of the Java bug to sneak onto the system.

“The differences are very subtle,” Peter James, a spokesman for Intego, said in an interview Tuesday. “There’s no password request [by Flashback.S].”

Much more in the two page article.

Apple will likely need to update their seek and destroy tool very quickly to help users stay free of this new variant.

If you think you are beginning to need an antivirus/antimalware solution, there are quite a few out there. Below are just a few:


Sophos Anti-Virus for Mac Home Edition
– Sophos has a worthy product out there and it is nice that they make their money on corporate/business computers and offer the home version for free.

ClamXav The Free Anti-Virus Solution for Mac OS X It uses the popular open source ClamAV engine as it’s back end and has the ability to detect both Windows and Mac threats.

There are other options as well for the Pay to Play crowd.

ESET Cybersecurity for Mac

And others from Intego Virus Barrier for Mac free and Pro versions available in the Mac App Store. Intego as noted above found this newest FlashBack in the wild). Other Mac antivirus firms Symantec/Norton, and many more.

Many of these come with a heavy CPU usage hit that is very annoying considering the small number of actual threats out there for the Mac. Of course some users may feel that the ones that provide real time protection are the way to go, some may feel it is worth it if their Macs are speedy enough and they have enough RAM.

For those who don’t think they need a Mac antivirus just yet, if you don’t use Java or none of your programs use Java, you could go to the ~/Applications/Utilities/Java Preferences.app and disable Java until you actually need it and then re-enable it as needed. It’s a very easy thing to do really.

Or you could set up AppleScript to monitor areas where malware might inject itself so it will alert you.

Monitor OS X LaunchAgents folders to help prevent malware attacks – CNET

Some additional locations to add can be found at MrAnderson.info here.

Also installing Piriform CCleaner for Mac is a great idea and can be run as needed very quickly every day even.

Certainly less of a system resource hit and one could still have a non-resident antivirus and scan at your convenience and respond if the Applescript tells you something is going on that you didn’t instigate by installing a program, etc.

The Applescript monitoring locations that you can set up is built with Mac OS X which is light on resources and free. The Applescript monitoring does a similar thing as WinPatrol does in Windows – but of course in a very small area comparatively. WinPatrol does so much more but the key similarity is the monitoring for changes to areas that malware can hit a Windows PC.

What we need for people who are not very savvy about these things is a MacPatrol app like WinPatrol.

Call Starkist

New version of Mac OS X Trojan exploits Word, not Java

New version of Mac OS X Trojan exploits Word, not Java – ZDNET

A second variant of the Mac OS X Trojan referred to as Backdoor.OSX.SabPub.a or SX/Sabpab-A is exploiting a Microsoft Word security hole, not the usual Java vulnerabilities used before.

Just a few days ago, a new Mac OS X Trojan was spotted in the wild that exploited Java vulnerabilities and required no user interaction to infect your Apple Mac, just like the Flashback Trojan. Kaspersky referred to it as “Backdoor.OSX.SabPub.a” while Sophoscalled it at “SX/Sabpab-A.” Now, both security firms have confirmed a different variant of this new Trojan that infects Macs by exploiting Microsoft Word, not Java.

Sophos detects the malicious Word documents as Troj/DocOSXDr-A and points to the following Microsoft Security Bulletin: MS09-027. Kaspersky meanwhile points to this security bulletin for the same Microsoft Word security hole: CVE-2009-0563.

So, it looks like uninstalling Java or disabling it is not the biggest threat afterall. 😉 Now you need to upgrade your Microsoft Office software to protect you from this.

Very important to do, and updating your Java is very important too through Apple Software Updates as Apple put out another update that not only fixed the problem, it also removed the malware infection if found.

Better late than never? Apple has released the third Java update in a week for Mac OS X, and this one contains the tool to remove the Flashback malware from infected systems. Beneath the belated fix to help users eradicate the threat, Apple has introduced a proactive approach to reducing security risk, and other vendors should take note.

Java update for OS X patches Flashback malware exploit

Java update for OS X patches Flashback malware exploit – CNET:

Following the recent Flashback malware developments for OS X where unpatched vulnerabilities in the latest Java runtime for OS X were being exploited, Apple has issued an update that brings Java up-to-date and patches these vulnerabilities.

The patch is available via Software Update for systems that have Java installed, but can also be downloaded from the following Apple support Web pages. The update is available only for OS X 10.6 and 10.7, since Apple has stopped supporting prior versions of OS X.

Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 7
Java for OS X Lion 2012-001

EDIT:

Mac Botnet Infects More Than 600,000 Apple Computers – eWeek

Apple’s security code of silence: A big problem – CNET
:

Security industry insiders have long known the Mac platform has its holes. The Flashback Trojan is the first in-the-wild issue that’s confirmed this, and big-time. More will follow unless Apple steps up its game.


Secure your Mac from Flashback infection – USAToday
:

Flashback is technically not a trojan-horse application at all, but a “drive-by download” that infects computers by exploiting a vulnerability in Web software.

That makes it much worse than a trojan: You just need to visit a malicious site, without downloading the wrong app or entering an admin password, to have this program silently take command of your Mac and begin altering the content of Web pages.

Find Out if Your Mac Has the Flashback Trojan — the Fast and Easy Way – Mashable – Two quick Applescript scripts if you are squeemish about running commands in a commandline terminal. I have not used them as I checked in commandline. Use at your own risk.

..

It is tragic that for all the online virus/malware scanners that are out there for Windows users, there do not appear to be any for Mac OS X. Now that is tragic.

Attackers exploit latest Flash bug on large scale

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]Attackers exploit latest Flash bug on large scale, says researcher (Computerworld):

Hackers are aggressively exploiting a just-patched Flash vulnerability, serving attack code “on a fairly large scale” from compromised sites as well as from their own malicious domains, a security researcher said Friday.

The attacks exploit the critical Flash Player bug that Adobe patched June 14 with its second “out-of-band,” or emergency update, in nine days.

Check your current version of Adobe Flash and make sure you have their latest version. They have put out 2 out of band updates recently, so we all need to really be sure.

Newest MacDefender installs without password

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]Newest MacDefender scareware installs without a password (Computerworld)

Criminals ‘give Apple the finger,’ says security researcher, by releasing new version just hours after Apple warned of fake AV software

Joy…This just hours after Apple decided to finally help users defend against these fake AV scams, as well as provide a way to rid the Mac of the problem.

The article notes given the name of the new malware and the timing of its release, they definitely think it does seem like a reactionary message.

And the worst part … now no password needed. Or maybe the worst part will be the new spammer’s URL shortening scheme?

Spammers establish their own fake URL-shortening services (Help Net Security)
:

Under this scheme, shortened links created on these fake URL-shortening sites are not included directly in spam messages. Instead, the spam emails contain shortened URLs created on legitimate URL-shortening sites.

These shortened URLs lead to a shortened-URL on the spammer’s fake URL-shortening Web site, which in turn redirects to the spammer’s own Web site.


Mac malware authors release a new, more dangerous version (ZDNet)
:

Yesterday, 25 days after the Mac Defender malware began to appear in the wild, Apple finally responded. In a technical support note, “How to avoid or remove Mac Defender malware,” the company posted instructions for users to follow if they’ve encountered this malware specimen in the wild. It also promised a security update to remove infections automatically.

File that memo under, “Too little, too late.”

Yes….it does seem so.

If you want to keep your money Apple, you should be thinking about protecting your users a whole lot quicker than this from now on.

God help all Apple users, the gloves are off…be on your guard for MacGuard…