New Metaspoit 0-Day IE7, IE8, IE9, WinXP, Vista, Windows 7

New Metasploit 0-day exploit for IE 7, 8 & 9 on Windows XP, Vista, and 7 – SecurityStreet/Rapid7

We have some Metasploit freshness for you today: A new zero-day exploit for Internet Explorer 7, 8, and 9 on Windows XP, Vista and 7. Computers can get compromised simply by visiting a malicious website, which gives the attacker the same privileges as the current user. Since Microsoft has not released a patch for this vulnerability yet, Internet users are strongly advised to switch to other browsers, such as Chrome or Firefox, until a security update becomes available. The exploit had already been used by malicious attackers in the wild before it was published in Metasploit. The associated vulnerability puts about 41% of Internet users in North America and 32% world-wide at risk (source: StatCounter). We have added the zero-day exploit module to Metasploit to give the security community a way to test if their systems are vulnerable and to develop counter-measures.

Here’s the back story: Some of you may remember that a couple of weeks ago, the Metasploit exploit team released a blog regarding a new Java exploit (CVE-2012-4681), with a blog entry titled “Let’s Start the Week with a New Java 0day in Metasploit“. You’d think the 0-day attack from the same malicious group might cool down a little after that incident… well, you’d be wrong. …

BOLD and COLOR emphasis mine.

I am sure that they only tested IE7, IE8 and IE9 initially on this because those are the only IE browsers in use right now for Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 and based on the w3Counter, the largest number of IE users at this time.

He also said that if he were to test IE10, he was certain it would fail the test as well.

One can only imagine how miserably IE6, as the highest level of IE that works on Win2K, would do. You would think that most people have moved onto newer versions of Windows, but some have not sadly despite the fact that Win2K hasn’t had an update since I think July 2010 and despite articles like this one from Ed Bott January 16, 2010. Don’t think it’s a big issue? Well according to the IE6Countdown website, IE6 still has an impressive 6% of Internet users worldwide as of August 2012.

Sure the USA’s piece of pie for IE6 is only 0.04% but I know a few of those folks and they are diehard users who refuse to leave a dead OS and browser due to economic issues, or sight issues, or both. Now, to their credit, some of these Win2K users do have a NAT hardware router, a software firewall, and they use Firefox and not IE6, but still, Win2K has not had any updates since July 2010! Not a wise move.

Personally,  I have NO addons allowed to work in IE8 in Windows XP by default on the Installations of Windows XP SP3 that I have still running, or IE9 on Windows 7.

I lock down my other browsers with no scripting type extensions like NoScript on Firefox, Chrome, etc. regardless of the operating system I am using (Windows, Mac, Linux), as well as Adblock Plus.

Another great little program for Windows that can help you keep a handle on what is happening on your Windows computer is BillP Studio’s WinPatrol Plus and FREE WinPatrol. I use it on my WinXP SP3 as an added protection since I have a laptop that can only run WinXP (SP3 of course), I use very intermittently for special use tasks such as setting up routers, or downloading music using Amazon Downloader, or sites that use OverDrive Media Console, etc. which won’t run on Linux on my laptop. This is when I am on the road using Library or Starbucks, or other public wifi hotspots due to our bandwidth limitations here at home on Verizon Wireless.

And I have found it to be wise to use a different browser (locked down of course as much as you can tolerate), rather than the ‘ubiquitous’ browser (IE in Windows, Safari on the Mac, or whatever the default browser is in a given GUI in Linux) in any given operating system.

One can not leave this to chance these days, IMHO.

 

EDIT: Added articles – one more about the exploit and the link to information on Microsoft’s workaround:

Update: Hackers exploit new IE zero-day vulnerability – Computerworld

Customers can use the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) 3.0 to harden IE enough to ward off the current attacks, said Wee, of the company’s Trustworthy Computing Group, in an email late on Monday.EMET 3.0 can be downloaded from Microsoft’s websites.

Microsoft issues workaround for IE 0-day exploited in current attacks – net-security.org

Microsoft has reacted fast by issuing a security advisory yesterday, in which it confirms the existence of the flaw in Internet explorer 9 and all previous versions (IE10 is not affected), and offers instructions on steps the users can take to mitigate – but not yet remove – the threat:

  • Deploy the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) and configure it for Internet Explorer
  • Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to “High” to block ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones
  • Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

These steps could bring additional problems to the users, such as being bombarded by a slew of security warnings, so until Microsoft releases a definitive patch for the hole, maybe it would be easier for IE users to take Rapid7’s advice and switch to another browser for the time being.

Again BOLD emphasis mine.

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Internet Explorer Search Bar Malware Hijack

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]Recently, the Google Gala malware has been hijacking the Google Search engine in Internet Explorer’s Search Bar. In addition, Fast Browser Searching apparently has been being installed through some means and stealing the Google Homepage of other users.

Google Gala and Fast Search hijacks is nothing new, but they are making a serious comeback. I am not sure how they are injecting themselves into the Google Search on IE8 Search Bar, but they definitely are corrupting the Google Search engine in the IE8 Search Bar. This has been known to happen in Firefox in the past as well. And who knows how long it will be till Google Chrome and other browsers will be hit the same way, if not already.

Browser makers need to harden their Search Bar against this type of attack, but until they do, we have to take matters into our own hands.

If you feel the need to use Internet Explorer, I would strongly suggest hiding or removing the IE8 Search Box and going directly to Google website instead.

As shown at w7forums link above, to hide/remove the IE8 Search Box:

Start -> run -> gpedit.msc

Or better yet, change to an alternative browser, like Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

The advantages of Google Chrome with built-in Flash player that is updated automatically through Google Chrome’s update mechanism is quite attractive. In addition, Google Chrome is fast to load and now has extensions such as Adblock Plus, WOT, FlashBlock and others, like Mozilla Firefox has had for a long time. In addition, Google Chrome has a built-in ‘sandbox’ feature which can save a world of hurt while browsing the web. Although it is not perfect, it is a great feature.

I have to say for years now, I have not used any built-in browser search bar. I go directly to the Google website, or other favorite search engine websites directly. I would suggest that, until browser developers harden their search bars, it would be wise to not make use of search bars for searching.

In addition, I would strongly suggest you install and run, CCleaner frequently. Close your browser after every use and right click on the Recycle Bin and choose Run CCleaner after every use of the browser.

If you do get hit with malware like Security Shield for any reason, but especially in this case, due to the redirection/hijack of search results in the IE8 Search Bar, you will need to use rkill or the Task Manager (if available) to find/kill the Security Shield oddball named process and then update and run Malwarebytes Antimalware to get rid of related registry entries, hidden files, etc., as shown at BleepingComputers Forum Security Shield (Uninstall Guide).

Or call your computer expert to help you with removal of the malware.

The most important thing is not to continue to use the computer on the Internet until it is removed to keep from getting hit with more malware. Redirection to malware sites posing as legitimate websites and searches is a strong possibility while infected with malware.

EDIT: I started writing this post yesterday morning and got it published at 12:06PM. Within hours, there was a security advisory by Microsoft and articles about:

Microsoft Security Advisory (2501696)
Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the scope of the advisory?
Microsoft is investigating new public reports of a vulnerability in MHTML on all supported editions of Microsoft Windows. This vulnerability manifests itself in Internet Explorer.

Is this a security vulnerability that requires Microsoft to issue a security update?
Upon completion of this investigation, Microsoft will take the appropriate action to help protect our customers. This may include providing a security update through our monthly release process, or providing an out-of-cycle security update, depending on our customer needs.

What is MHTML?
MHTML (MIME Encapsulation of Aggregate HTML) is an Internet standard that defines the MIME structure that is used to wrap HTML content. The MHTML protocol handler in Windows provides a pluggable protocol (MHTML:) that permits MHTML encoded documents to be rendered in applications.

What causes this threat?
The vulnerability exists due to the way MHTML interprets MIME-formatted requests for content blocks within a document. It is possible for this vulnerability to allow an attacker to run script in the wrong security context.

What might an attacker use this vulnerability to do?
An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could inject a client-side script in the user’s Internet Explorer instance. The script could spoof content, disclose information, or take any action that the user could take on the affected Web site on behalf of the targeted user.

How could an attacker exploit the vulnerability?
In a Web-based attack scenario, an attacker could convince a user to click a specially crafted link that would inject a malicious script in the response of the Web request.

Sure sounds like this may be the problem I was writing about in this posting.

Oracle, Java and Security

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]Oracle, Java and Security … oh my!

Java bug exposes users to serious code-execution risk – Researchers disclose because Oracle won’t!

This zero day bug, which is in the Java Web Start (this is automatically added as an ‘extension’ in Firefox – which I always disable) has become a real problem. Here’s a quote from the article regarding the Researchers’ attempt to make Oracle understand the severity of this issue:

Both researchers stressed the ease in which attackers can exploit the bug using a website that silently passes malicious commands to various Java components that jump-start applications in Internet Explorer, Firefox, and other browsers. Ormandy said he alerted Java handlers in Oracle’s recently-acquired Sun division to the threat but “they informed me they do not consider this vulnerability to be of high enough priority to break their quarterly patch cycle.

(bold emphasis in the quote mine)

Merely disabling ActiveX or Firefox plugins isn’t enough because the toolkit is installed separately from Java. That means the only temporary fixes are browser specific for IE and Firefox and involve setting killbits or employing file system access control list features. (More about that here).

Or we could always just uninstall Java entirely until Oracle decides to protect their users.

That is a sad option since Secunia makes use of Java for it’s OSI (Online Software Inspector) which has become a very handy free tool for folks to keep up on the myriad of “Internet-facing” programs, plugins, missing Windows Updates, etc.

And of course, Weather.gov (for animated maps) and NASA/JPL use Java for many online projects. I would think they would want Oracle to rethink their position on this problem!

Plus, this is not just a Microsoft Windows Issue. The article also notes that this could affect Linux.

And from the sound of it, also Apple’s Mac OS; particularly since Apple is slow to upgrade Java on their OS platform, and they haven’t done an update for Java in a while for OS X Tiger at all.

What a mess. This issue with Java vulnerabilities, and how Oracle is handling it, may well provide a backdrop that opens up other concerns about Oracle’s stance on security related to their flagship products … things that maybe Oracle wouldn’t want folks to start thinking about…