WinPatrol Changing of the guard

WinPatrol – Scotty

WinPatrol has been very important over the years. I have several (six I think at least) lifetime memberships of WinPatrol software and I install it on all my Windows installs personally and for my friends, family and clients. It has been a staple in my security arsenal for many years now, and BillP has been a great friend to all of us.

BillP, thank you so much for continuing to look for someone who would fit the bill, as it were, and you certainly found a great choice!

I am very excited about the promise that Bret Lowry made to WinPatrol customers:

My commitment to WinPatrol customers is as follows:

One, your lifetime PLUS licenses are just that, lifetime licenses. That was the easiest topic in our negotiation and is written into the contract.

Two, WinPatrol will not have toolbars or other “add-ins” added to it or its installer. Installers that do that drive me crazy because I’m the guy people call to “fix” their computer after the installer completes its hijacking. I am not going to do that to my customers.

Three, I will be responsible for answering support questions, even more incentive to play nicely and stand-by item two above. And

Four, I use WinPatrol myself and therefore am committed to the continued improvement of WinPatrol. I am honored to have earned Bill’s trust and confidence in his allowing me to purchase WinPatrol. Bill has run WinPatrol with integrity since its inception, as a founder of Ruiware (along with my wife), I promise we will carry on that tradition.”

BillP, after reading your blog posting and Corrine’s Security Garden posting, I was totally thrilled to read about Bret Lowry, Ruiware, LLC being your choice.

Totally awesome! I knew you wouldn’t let us down! Thank you Bill for all the years you have given to us! We totally understand your need to step aside and wish your family all the best and your family is ever in my thoughts and prayers.

Corrine, thank you for letting us know of the change right away!

This must be a bittersweet day for BillP; to let go of his baby, to turn it over to someone else, but sweet knowing he turned it over to a great guy who will care for his customers the way he did.

Hi Bret Lowry! I am excited to meet you in Bits from Bill and from Security Garden Blog. Thank you for putting our minds at ease about the commitment you have given us. Hope you will still do the sales periodically like BillP always did and keep the price economical and the free edition which is so important.

On WinPatrol.com:

I’m very happy to announce WinPatrol’s future will be in the hands of Ruiware founder and former lead at Sunbelt Software, Bret Lowry. If you read today’s post and download our new version later today you’ll understand why I’m confident Scotty is in good hands.
Click here to find out why

And this wonderful note from Bret too:

WinPatrol.com - WinPatrol from Ruiware.

WinPatrol.com – WinPatrol from Ruiware. “When I discovered WinPatrol I knew it was a winner and a program I’d install for my entire family. WinPatrol customers matter. You still won’t find obnoxious toolbars when you download WinPatrol. Instead, we help you get rid of them. Thanks, Bret Lowry — Click on image to go to WinPatrol.com

In closing, I would like to echo Corrine’s thoughts from her Security Garden blog entry:

On a personal note, I have long respected Bill Pytlovany and, because of his honesty and high ethical standards, held him in high esteem.  I know I won’t be losing contact with him but still wish to take this opportunity to publicly thank Bill for providing an excellent product.

I could not have said it any better!

IE Zero-Day Vulnerability

Microsoft Security Advisory 2963983 – Vulnerability in Internet Explorer Could Allow Remote Code Execution – TechNet

General Information

Executive Summary

Microsoft is aware of limited, targeted attacks that attempt to exploit a vulnerability in Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, Internet Explorer 8, Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 10, and Internet Explorer 11.

The vulnerability is a remote code execution vulnerability. The vulnerability exists in the way that Internet Explorer accesses an object in memory that has been deleted or has not been properly allocated. The vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code in the context of the current user within Internet Explorer. An attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit this vulnerability through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website.

On completion of this investigation, Microsoft will take the appropriate action to protect our customers, which may include providing a solution through our monthly security update release process, or an out-of-cycle security update, depending on customer needs.

We are actively working with partners in our Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP) to provide information that they can use to provide broader protections to customers. For information about protections released by MAPP partners, see MAPP Partners with Updated Protections.

Microsoft continues to encourage customers to follow the guidance in the Microsoft Safety & Security Center of enabling a firewall, applying all software updates, and installing antimalware software.

Mitigating Factors:

  • By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration. This mode mitigates this vulnerability.

  • By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Outlook Express, and Windows Mail open HTML email messages in the Restricted sites zone. The Restricted sites zone, which disables script and ActiveX controls, helps reduce the risk of an attacker being able to use this vulnerability to execute malicious code. If a user clicks a link in an email message, the user could still be vulnerable to exploitation of this vulnerability through the web-based attack scenario.

  • An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.

  • In a web-based attack scenario, an attacker could host a website that contains a webpage that is used to exploit this vulnerability. In addition, compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements could contain specially crafted content that could exploit this vulnerability. In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these websites. Instead, an attacker would have to convince users to visit the website, typically by getting them to click a link in an email message or Instant Messenger message that takes users to the attacker’s website.

More information in the full article. There is no patch. But Microsoft has given some recommendations which are easier to understand at Security Garden’s posting:

Recommendations

As illustrated in the “Security Research and Defense Blog” reference below, users of IE 10 and 11 should ensure they haven’t disabled Enhanced Protection Mode.

Another option is to install the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET). The recommended setting for EMET 4.1, available from KB Article 2458544, is automatically configured to help protect Internet Explorer. No additional steps are required.

See the Tech Net Advisory for instructions on changing the following settings to help protect against exploitation of this vulnerability:

  • Change your settings for the Internet security zone to high to block ActiveX controls and Active Scripting

  • Change your settings to prompt before running Active Scripting or to disable Active Scripting in the Internet and Local intranet security zone.

 

Those still using Windows XP on the Internet, please be aware:

VERY IMPORTANT FOR ANY HOLD OUT WINDOWS XP USERS

This is the first of the security vulnerabilities that DOES NOT include workarounds  for Windows XP. The oldest Windows noted as being affected are: Windows Server 2003 SP2 and Vista SP2.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Once a Microsoft product’s support has expired — as is true now about Windows XP SP3 since April 8, 2014 — Microsoft no longer lists it as affected by the vulnerabilities being patched. Microsoft only list Windows versions which are still under Mainstream Support or Extended Support. This has always been the case.

If anyone is still using Windows XP on the Internet (UNWISE!!), it would be strongly recommended to disallow IE (Internet Explorer) access to the Internet through your software firewall*, and use another browser like Firefox and Google Chrome which will still be getting updates for a time.

* Any Windows XP users still on the Internet should at least have:

  • a hardware router with Stateful Packet Firewall
  • should be using a ‘real’ software firewall as well as a good AV program. Just one good choice that will continue to support Windows XP is ESET’s Smart Security which is a very good antivirus and firewall. It is the one I use. It is not free. There are several free antivirus programs but not many free security suites.
  • block Internet Explorer through the ESET or other software firewall.
  • should be using a 3rd party browser like Mozilla Firefox with NoScript, Adblock Plus and WOT to help sort out safer search results on search engines, or Google Chrome with ScriptSafe, Adblock Plus and WOT Extension.
  • uninstall Java entirely, keep Adobe Flash religiously updated for Firefox as long as Adobe continues to provide them. Google Chrome updates Flash within itself. Might want to switch from Adobe Reader to Sumatra PDF reader which is a simple PDF viewer.
  • need to be even more careful than ever before about where you go. The bad guys will be looking with great anticipation for computers with expired Windows XP.
  • no risky behavior
  • no banking … note very soon banks will be disallowing expired Windows XP entirely anyway.

IMPORTANT: You can not block a program from getting out to the Internet with the Windows XP Firewall. It is only a one way firewall. It only monitors incoming Internet requests, instead of both ways as any real firewall including Windows 7 and Windows 8 built-in software firewalls do.

Here’s a quote from a ZDNet article:

To those planning to stick resolutely with the aged Windows XP operating system even after Microsoft ends support next year, the advice from experts is simple: Don’t do it.

Again: I would strongly suggest you get a new computer, upgrade your computer if it can be upgraded to a modern/still supported Windows such as Windows 7 or Windows 8, or get a Mac, or you could  convert/upgrade the computer to Linux or use a Linux LiveCD to visit the Internet and still use Windows XP as a standalone NOT CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET computer.

If you need help with any of this, please contact your computer guru, join a forums like Scot’s Newsletter Forums – BATL (Bruno’s All Things Linux) to ask questions, or you can use the contact info on my website  to contact me for some help.

WinPatrol PLUS For Everyone Just $2

Tech gift guide: Gift copy of WinPatrol Plus gives lifetime of PC protection – USAToday

There are a couple of reasons you might want to shell out $29.95 for gift copies of WinPatrol Plus and give them to all the PC users on your shopping list.

WinPatrol may be one of the best kept secrets in computer protection. What’s more, it is the creation of an iconic tech personality, Bill Pytlovany, one-man researcher/developer/distributor at BillP Studios.

Pytlovany has a loyal following of tech geeks who swear by the basic version of WinPatrol, which he created in 1997, graciously keeps updated and continues to make available for free — for the greater good.

I found the above article while reading BillP’s blog posting: WinPatrol PLUS For Everyone Just $2:

About once a year I go crazy and try to introduce WinPatrol PLUS to the folks who have never heard of WinPatrol or have never experienced this small powerful app. For over 15 years WinPatrol has been recommended by friends and family but I never invested in any kind of expensive PR campaign.

I heard about WinPatrol many years ago, at least 10-15 years ago … it could have been when it first came out. But I am not really sure. I could have found WinPatrol from Corrine at one of the Anti-Spyware forums I frequented, or FreedomList where she is an admin, or at Scot’s Newsletter Forum where she is also a fellow admin. Or it could have been through Fred Langa‘s LangaList which I subscribed to for many years before Fred merged LangaLIst with WindowsSecrets Newsletter with Brian Livingston who himself retired in 2010, or from an article in WindowsMag (one of my all time favorite magazines. I was very sad that CMP retired Windows Mag on June 25, 1999 but we did have an online version at WinMag.com for a couple more years). WinMag had some great writers and they all knew BillP. WInMag and PCMag were my initial magazines for Windows in the early days. It is where I read great articles from: Scot Finnie, Fred Langa, Mike ElganKaren Kenworthy (1),  and many other great writers (I used to know all their names off the top of my head, now these four I remember the most).  But, I digress…

This is a great time to consider buying WinPatrol PLUS for only $2! Can’t beat it! And BillP’s WinPatrol is a best in class software! Check out the Free version at WinPatrol.com, and upgrade if you like it. Can’t go wrong for $2.

For those who (EEEK!) might still be using Microsoft’s old and long unsupported OSes;  Windows 98 or Win2K, WinPatrol Downloads has something for you as well.

BillP’s  Message to Windows XP users – Very important as the April 2014 retirement of Windows XP approaches.

WinPatrol runs on Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8 including x64 versions.

USA Today says…

“…best kept secret in computer protection.”

Disable Java – Windows, Mac, Linux

US Department of Homeland Security advises disabling Java following fresh zero-day vulnerability – The Verge

A new Trojan horse has been discovered that exploits a flaw found in Java, leaving computers running Windows, Mac OS, and Linux vulnerable to attack. Mal/JavaJar-B allows attackers to remotely trigger code once it infects a system, potentially leading to the installation of malware, or even ransomware. Oracle hasn’t yet patched the vulnerability, which targets even the latest version of Java.

US-CERT RECOMMENDS THAT USERS DISABLE JAVA IN WEB BROWSERS

Apple has already taken care of this on the Mac by updating to disallow all Java except including the new one that hasn’t even been released yet. Excellent move from Apple.

Firefox and Google Chrome has had you click to even use Java for awhile now. From my experience, I believe that includes the current version of Java as well. As noted above, Firefox now includes the current version of Java in their blacklist. You have to personally choose to actually use Java using their Click to Play feature. Thank you Mozilla!

Google Chrome has instituted on December 21, 2012, noted in their blog posting, a feature that disallows silent extension addon installations. I believe this is something that Mozilla did some time ago when they experienced problems with it. Or maybe not.

So you will definitely want to disable Java in all browsers in Windows, Linux and on the Mac just to be safe for now.

Internet Explorer now allows you to disallow plugins by default and only allow those you specifically allow. But if you have allowed Java in the past, you will want to disable it:

How to Disable Java – PCMag

The PCMag article gives instructions for all the main browsers. Check it out and please for your sake don’t use a browser for general use that allows Java at least for now.

Disable it in at least one browser that you can use for general purpose use.

Whichever method you choose, visit the Java test page at http://java.com/en/download/testjava.jsp to confirm that Java is disabled. Yes, you’ll occasionally run across a website that relies on Java. If necessary, you can temporarily enable Java for those sites. But you may be surprised at how little you miss it.

More here at Security Garden, Dottech.org (How to/tutorial with images) and Venture Beat as well.

I have Java totally disallowed in my main browser, and enabled in one of my other browsers so I can still go to Secunia.com to use their OSI (Online Security Inspector) to check plugins and Internet facing programs. I also compare that with Firefox’s plugin checker. This in Windows. On my Mac, I have Java disabled in all but one browser and turn Java on and off as needed overall. In Linux Java is also disabled in my main browser.

This is very important until Oracle gets this updated and is quick to fix these vulnerabilities.

Oracle really needs to get on the stick before they and all the programs that make use of them are made obsolete! And there are millions of them!!!

EDIT: As of 1/11/2013 – Added Mozilla’s and Apple’s change to include blacklisting of the current version of Java due to the Trojan affecting even the current version of Java. See the info earlier in the posting.

Microsoft Security Advisory (2798897)

Microsoft Security Advisory (2798897)

This is a security advisory about fraudulent certificates that need to be revoked!

As Security Garden wrote here:

Microsoft released Security Advisory 2798897 to provide notification regarding a a fraudulent digital certificate issued by TURKTRUST Inc.

TURKTRUST Inc. incorrectly created two subsidiary Certificate Authorities: (*.EGO.GOV.TR and e-islem.kktcmerkezbankasi.org). The *.EGO.GOV.TR subsidiary CA was used to issue a fraudulent digital certificate to *.google.com.

The Certificate Trust list update is available through Windows Updates.

Be sure to apply any Windows Updates that are waiting (showing in the lower right corner in the system tray) to be installed and/or check for Windows Updates manually to be sure you have the update!

This is an important update since fraudulent digital certificates can make spoofing attacks possible.

More information at KrebsOnSecurity here:

Google and Microsoft today began warning users about active phishing attacks against Google’s online properties. The two companies said the attacks resulted from a fraudulent digital certificate that was mistakenly issued by a Turkish domain registrar.

In a blog post published today, Google said that on Dec. 24, 2012, its Chrome Web browser detected and blocked an unauthorized digital certificate for the “*.google.com” domain.

More info from WOT and Firefox and Chrome:

Google blocked both certificates in Chrome on December 26. It now plans to no longer display “Extended Validation” status in Chrome for any certificate issued by TurkTrust. It’s debating whether to also block any connection to HTTPS sites validated by the CA.

Mozilla announced that it too was revoking trust for the two problem certificates in a Firefox update landing next Tuesday. TurkTrust’s root certificate is also being excluded from Firefox for the time being. Microsoft is doing the same, as are other browser vendors.

I would imagine that Apple will be also releasing an update to their Digital Certificate list if this is a universal issue.

Flash Player Update Causes Firefox Crashes

[tweetmeme source=”franscomputerservices” only_single=false]Flash Player Update Causes Firefox Crashes
SecurityGarden and GHacks

Due to the severity of the vulnerabilities, it is still recommended to upgrade but either disable the Flash Plugin (as noted in the Security Garden posting) or edit the mms.cfg file to change protected mode to 0 as noted in the GHacks article.

There is a third alternative, remove the Flash Player entirely or disable it in Firefox, then install and use Google Chrome which has a pretty good Adobe Flash sandboxing mode already — at least until Adobe gets this issue corrected for Firefox users.

There is more information at the Adobe page about this: Inside Flash Player Protected Mode for Firefox – Adobe